Family-Disaster-Dog-Lessons

Tuesday, October 22, 2013

Preparing


My new girl in training



Prepare  


By preparing for the worst
You learn what to do
With practice your actions become habits
And turn the worst into steps you walk to survive
Fear is replaced with the knowledge of knowing what to do
Confidence is restored
Especially when you have a partner, you can count on…
Like your dog

In memory of Miss Daisy 2001-2013
Wrinkledpups Daisy Mayham

In Memory of Sue 1997-2008
Rea Valley's Incredible Sue
Certified Mantrailer
Book of Champions

Update: The book is coming together nicely. Almost done. Sample Chapters coming soon. Thanks for your patience and following, it's been a busy year!

Thursday, September 5, 2013

Updated Backpack List

Hi All,

Miss Daisy and I updated the Family Disaster Dog Backpack list tonight. You can find the page in the menu above. I'm getting the book ready for publishing and it will be ready soon. Not to much longer. I want to thank you for all the following and patience. This has been a 2 year project of building this blog and writing the book.  There's more to come as soon as I'm onto that trail.

Daisy is doing good, she sends all a big old Bloodhound slobber..:)  and Willie G too and new pup Thunderfoot Watchee


Willie with buddy Mio

Sunday, July 21, 2013

Summer Dog Training

All is going good here at Family Disaster Dogs...a new puppy coming next week and the Family Disaster Book is almost ready for Publishing !!! Then we begin training meet-ups at the park, everyone is welcomed. 



                                Daisy's resting, getting ready for new puppy training.


Wishing you all a great summer season filled with lots of dog training !

We'll Be Back!

 ( With pictures of puppy in training )

Read Below to Pack your dog's emergency evacuation backpack...and follow the lessons on the lesson page above to teach your family dog how to rescue you.



Saturday, June 1, 2013

Preparing for Storms with your Dog

Preparing for Storms with your Dog  


 With the recent high level of tornado activity and the start of hurricane season upon us I thought it would be a good idea to tell you how to calm a dog or other pet during a disaster or storm.

I'll also post below the Family Disaster Dog Go Bag List for those who may of missed it before.

This is the season to be ready for a disaster to happen, especially if you live in tornado alley or on the coast where a hurricane can happen with little notice.  You should have at least a 3 day supply of food, first aid items, clothing and water in a carry bag near the front door in case you have to evacuate. Your dogs can carry these supplies if you need help due to age or disability, and your dog can carry extra supplies so your family can survive longer.

Now is the time to work with your family dog and show them how to carry a backpack with these supplies along with their own dog food. Train now while you have time.

You'll have a better chance of survival because you and your dog will know what to do.

Here is one of my articles from Suite 101 about how to calm a frightened pet. Pets can become scared for many reasons just like we do.

Loud noises,sudden actions and frightening experiences can turn a well mannered peaceful pet into a nightmare to handle or calm.

Once out of control you or the animal can be seriously injured so the smartest thing to do is to be prepared by knowing what to do. Regardless if the animal is a dog, cat, rabbit or horse it can be calmed down when it is frightened or stressed with the use of voice and body movements.

Owners or handlers can unintentionally make an animal harder to handle if they do not know how to calm the animal.

Assess the Situation

The first concern before touching the animal is to try to determine what is making the animal upset.

Is the animal scared or mad because it does not want to do something being asked? Is the animal hurt? An injured animal can be very dangerous and difficult to handle and calm down.

Be careful as you slowly approach the animal. Do a quick visual assessment of what is going on in the animal’s surroundings as you approach. Try to see what might be causing the excitement. A caged animal may be caught or snagged on the fencing causing the animal to lash out as if hurt or mad.

Taking Action

Once the situation is apparent then a safe course of action can follow. If the animal is upset due to something frightening or the animal is being asked to perform and refuses by turning mean or upset, stop what is being done or remove what is frightening at once. Finish reading here-----  Suite101   


Family Disaster Dog Go Bag- 72 hour Bug Out Backpack List

Place there items in a dog backpack after you have gotten your dog used to carrying the backpack by rubbing the pack over the dog and gently placing it on the dog without anything in it.  Allow the dog to wear the backpack  a little bit. to get use to it.

Slowly place the items in the bags. Go slowly so your dog doesn't get scared. Once they are comfortable with the packs then you can pack it and take them for a walk.  Be sure to tighten the straps slowly, and not to tightly.

Most dogs feel proud to have a backpack, they really like them.

Dog or Pet 72 hour Ready Bag-Go-Bag and Bug-Out Bag 

Items Needed

This is not the usually list of items needed in a bug out or go bag for pets. I've added extra items based on my SAR and Red Cross training plus personal experience. These items go into your dog's backpack with copies of dog Id, health record and your contact information, next of kin or emergency contact.

You keep copies of paperwork in your own backpack too.

Waterproof everything by placing each item in its own sealed baggie even if the dog backpack is waterproof.

Items to place in Dog or Cat Bug-Out Go-Bag are:

A current color photograph of you and your pet together (in case you are separated)

Food, water – 3-day supply for each pet and yourself
(you can hang water bottles from your dog's pack or harness)
Bowls - non-spill  w/lid if possible
Collar and leash -for dogs and cats

Muzzle or a pair of woman's panty hoses or stockings
(  Stockings are compact with many uses, such as a piece as a muzzle for a hurt animal, a filter to strain dirt from water, a bandage plus they can keep you warm or be used as an ace elastic bandage)

Instead of Poop Scoop Baggies just pack some regular sandwich bags so you can use them for other purposes too.

Treats, toy, at least 3 days worth of light weight high quality dog food.
1 small lightweight blanket, towel, or newspaper for warmth

ID tag should always be on pet's harness or collar
Extra name tag should be on the backpack, be sure to put a nameplate on your bag too, on attached so it will not come off. With your cell phone number.

In case you can drive away in order to evacuate or bug out. Pet carrier or crate for each pet labeled with pet and owner’s information (keep near your bag).

Allergy medicine or other special medicines with instructions

Pack the items below as a Pet First Aid Kit in its own small waterproof container or baggie that will fit in the dog's backpack.

Scissors-other pocket knife
Band-aids don't stick to dog fur but a few for your friends can come in handy.
Several Gauze pads and medical cotton squares
Alcohol Wipes
Instant cold pack (to big to carry-cold mud works in a pinch)
Medical and Adhesive tape
Tweezers
1 small bar Soap
1 small tube Antiseptic cream
1 small bottle Eye drops
10-20 Cotton balls
Powder Gatorade or electrolytes
Large Tea Bags (stops bleeding)
Vet Wrap (like an ace bandage for animals and sticks to itself,very handy)
Glow lite Sticks (hang one on your dog and self at night to be seen)

Wrap some pieces of duck tape around one of the bottles for later use
Make sure to waterproof every item.

If you are in snake country put a small container or baggie with the cooking spice Adolf's  Meat Tenderizer which contains a fruit extract which neutralizes snake and spider, Scorpion types of venom. I've used it several times with rattlesnake bit dogs.

Also pack 2 or more tubes depending on the size of your dog of Nutri-Cal Concentrated Dog Food. This a source used for sick animals that cannot eat. 1 teaspoon per 10lbs body weight will keep your dog alive after you run out of dog food. This is a good standby to have. 1 tube will keep a small dog well fed without any other food source for 4- 5 days.

If you have room in your dog's pack Family Disaster Dogs recommends adding these items to your dog’s Go-Bag or Bug Out pack.

A compass and a map of your area
A small flashlight with extra batteries or another light source
Water Purification Tablets
12 Hour Emergency Bright Sticks
16 Hour Hand Warmer
Mylar Emergency Blanket
Extra Collar & Leash Set
Reflective Dog Vest
Rain Coat and Boots will give your dog some protection in a nuclear fall out as will a full
Body rain suit for your self. in your dog's backpack.
Tie-Out leash or chain 10-15 ft long

You can get more information about go-bags and packing your dog for evacuation on the K9 Go Bag page link above.




Your Dog's Ready When You Are!!!

Tuesday, March 26, 2013

Spring 2013 Update

Hi Everyone,

First off, I want to apologize for not keeping up on posting lessons here at Family Disaster Dogs. The only excuse that I have for not being online is because I've been busy offline with the pet spa business I bought last year.

I'm happy to say we've grown to the point of moving into the much larger storefront space next door where we'll have a dog training room and offer Family Disaster Dog lessons in person. Along with dog training and professional all breed grooming we'll have dog daycare suites set up like home, play groups and afternoon yappy hour group play dates.

The lobby is being set up as a comfortable pet friendly wifi and coffee lounge where owners can mingle while pets enjoy our services in other areas of the store.

I have been working on the Family Disaster Book in my spare time, and do hope to have the editing and final copy ready for publishing in the next month or so. Please stay tuned for more online lessons and quick tips that will soon be coming your way. I'll be sending out book offers as soon as the publishing dates are set.

I'm planning a follow up book about how your dog can help you survive in extreme conditions or if your ever lost..although not many people get lost with a dog along.

Before I go here's a Family Disaster Dog tip;

Dogs have saved many children who have become lost by staying with the child and keeping them warm overnight.

If the child knew to hold the dog by the collar and tell the dog to "go home", the dog would most likely take the child home at a pace the child can handle because the dog will sense the urgency.

Most dogs know what the word  'home" means. Use the word often to teach your dog.

Most family dogs would rather go home instead of sleep in the woods overnight but they don't want to leave a member of the family behind.

Dogs have to be asked or they will wait.

Use this tip to teach your children how to use the family dog to go home in case they are ever lost.

This will work for adults who get lost too.




Sunday, February 24, 2013

Quick Dog Training Tricks

 "Quick Family Disaster Dog Training" will be posted weekly along with two regular monthly lessons to show you how your family dog can come to your aid during an emergency or major disaster.




Quick Dog Training Tricks 

Teach your dog to pick up or retrieve objects by name or command 


1.  Teach your dog to play with a toy

2. Use a command or word like "Fetch, Go-Get, Retrieve "

3. When dog is retrieving the toy on command attach toy to an object you wish the dog to get for you or place the toy with the item.

4. Use the command or word like "fetch" with the objects name

5. Ask dog to find toy/object by the name or command you used

6. Once dog is bringing you the toy and object remove toy

7. Ask dog to find object by name

8. When dog finds or brings you object then praise dog with toy and play

Once dog is retrieving object you ask for you by name then you can add other object by names


Wrinkledpups Daisy Mayham Fetching


Important Dog News~~~~~~~

Pet Food Recalls and other great pet care advice 
can be found at Wendy's Animal Talk



Saturday, February 9, 2013

Family Dogs and Working Dogs Scent Discrimination

Family Dog and Working Dog Scent Discrimination


This article explains how your family dog can tell the difference between you and another person or object. This information applies to Family Disaster Dogs, Tracking Dogs and Trailing Dogs as well as any dog who is using its nose to find an object, person or pet.

Scent discrimination can be a complicated and complex subject.

When I was first learning Bloodhound handling and training with my dog Sue, our SAR dog mentor and instructor, Lt. Ezra Roberts explained the basics of scent discrimination to me in what I continue to believe is the easiest way possible.
Amber and Incredible Sue


I smile in remembrance of Ezra as I write this..I couldn't of asked for a better mentor.

He said, " When a Bloodhound smells a chocolate cake they smell every ingredient of the cake. The flour, sugar, eggs and coco while other dogs smell only the chocolate cake. "

This is the difference between a dog trained to scent discriminate. They smell one scent out of many many scents.

Dogs that are not trained to scent discriminate will search for only one scent, such as, live human scent but not each individual person within that human scent. They will find any human scent and all human scent in a certain search area by air scenting, tracking and  grid working. They will find every person or object's scent they are trained to find, such as bombs, drugs, humans live and remains. They are trained using only one scent article or smell.

Other dogs are trained to find many different scents or a scent they are given by the handler. These dogs are scent discriminating when they find a drug or object the handler asked them to find.

Service dogs who are trained to get the newspaper, slippers and dropped items of their owners are scent and sight discriminating. They know your slippers from another person's slippers.

Bloodhounds are different in that they process the ability to scent discriminate naturally. When a Bloodhound is given a scent article they start looking for that scent without much training at all. The handler gets most of the training and not the dog.

We don't train Bloodhounds they train us. Family dogs of all ages act naturally like the Bloodhounds when they stay close to their owners, bring your their toy or follow a special family member.

These dogs are choosing to discriminate. All dogs can discriminate and they do naturally.
It is up to us humans to take advantage of this natural ability in the dog and teach our dogs what we wish them to find or who.

When we train our family dogs to find objects by name we are teaching them to discriminate.

You can learn how to train your family dog to discriminate by going to our lesson page here. or click the page button at the top of this page.

Coming Soon "My Puppy Can Find Me" picture book that teaches your child and dog to work together so they are never lost and can find you ! 

Sign up for updates at familydisasterdogs.net

Tuesday, February 5, 2013

More Free Lessons Coming Soon

More Free Lessons Coming Soon


 

Feb 2013 Tracking and Scent Discrimination

The differences of scent discrimination in tracking dogs.

How your family dog can use their nose for different scenting jobs.


March 2013 Missing Persons

Using and teaching your dog to find your child.

How to teach an old dog to track or trail a person or lost pet.

April 2013 Survival

How to teach your dog to gather your family in one place.

How to train your to come to your rescue.

Be sure and check out the lesson links below !

Learn more about Family Disaster Dogs in the post below,,, 

Happy trails



Thursday, January 24, 2013

Lesson Links for Family Disaster Dogs


Family Disaster Dogs





Family Disaster Dogs 
was formed
 to show you, the public...


How your family dog can come to 

your aid during a Disaster.






Every dog has the ability to find its family members or friends. 


Dogs do this on their own everyday without us noticing.



Listed below are links to dog training lessons 
that have been posted here since 2010. 

These lessons are here so you can practice with your family pet 
and learn how to save your family, neighbors and friends in a disaster.


These lessons are free for you to read, print and share with friends. 
(please do)


You and your dog will learn 

How To

Survive with your Dog's Help

Find a Missing Person in rubble, woods or city settings

Prepare for Emergency

Dog Backpacking for Disaster

Dog Tracking 

Messenger Dogs Skills

A family Disaster Dog 

is a 

Survival Dog

Other Dog Tricks for Assisting in Emergencies. 




Family Disaster Dog Chloe-Anastasia's Girl  
click the blue print to go to that page

Read why Training your dog is important on the Disaster page

Equipment needed page click here

Glossary and Terms of Words Used to Train Search Dogs Here

Learn about Scent Article on this Page

Contact Us Page


  Family Disaster Dogs  

  Lesson  



What is a Family Disaster Dog ?..It's Your Dog Helping You! 

Click here to read more




Lesson 4:  "Find it!" 

Lesson 5: How to use a Tracking Leash part 1

Lesson 6: More Leash Work  part 2

Lesson 7: Tracking Leash part 3




Lesson 11:  Scent Behavior

Lesson 12:  How to Read a Dog

Lesson 13:  How to Train your dog to do a Building Search

Lesson 14:  Train your dog to do an  Air Scent and Area Search

Lesson 15: How your dog will be  Indicating and Alerting a Found person



Lesson 18:  How to use a leash






Lesson 24:  Learn Area Search Basics

Lesson 25: How to do Area Search Training

Lesson 26: How to do Cadaver Dog Training

Lesson 27: How a dog can Alert to Danger

Part 1: Teaching your dog to alert you to danger  Part 1 Alert to Danger

Part 2: Teach your dog Part 2 Alert to Danger 

Lesson 28:  Dog learns how to come back to you after they find somebody or thing Teaching Refind or Return to Handler

Lesson 29: Your dog brings you items you need Retrieve and Go-Get Object 

Lesson 30: Dog learns item by name to bring you Retrieve Object by Name






To Support the training and promotion of Family Disasters Dogs  Click Here

We are available for email, phone and in person and group lessons.

Call us at Merdog Pet Spa 541-999-8002 

We will be holding Free Training Meet-ups during the summer of 2013 on the beautiful Oregon coast, in several towns, call or contact us through G+, FB, Twitter, email..or stop by the spa. Dates will be announced online and in local newspapers.

Sunday, January 6, 2013

FAQ about How a Dog’s Nose Works


FAQ about How a Dog’s Nose Works



This information has been gathered from the internet to help you understand how a dog's nose works. In the first article, the author points out additional reasons why you should pay attention to the weather when you are working your tracking dog.

How Long Can Scent Survive?
© 2007 Missing Pet Partnership. All rights reserved.

The text below is an edited excerpt from MPP founder Kat Albrecht's book DOG DETECTIVES: Train Your Dog to Find Lost Pets. There are many opinions and claims regarding just how long a scent trail can last. Missing Pet Partnership posts this information because some pet owners are hiring pet detectives who claim that their dogs can track a scent trail that is several months old and even up to a year old.

MPP founder Kat Albrecht has spent eighteen years training and working search dogs, observing other search dogs in training, and learning from search dog authorities across the country. She's familiar with aged trail experiments performed by experienced Bloodhound trainers.

Based on her knowledge of what other credible Bloodhound handlers have experienced, her training through the National Police Bloodhound Association (NPBA), and her personal experience in working successful cases with search dogs that she has personally trained and/or worked with, she is comfortable in estimating that in optimal scent conditions (cool, damp areas with heavy vegetation and no wind) a trained trailing dog is probably capable of following a scent trail that is up to three (possibly even four) weeks old.

Keep in mind, however, that even if the scent trail is too old for a search dog to track, a MAR Technician can POTENTIALLY HELP YOU find your lost pet using other methods, including using his or her dog to track a fresher scent trail from a viable sighting.

"The ideal working scent conditions for a trailing dog are cool, moist days with no wind. ( what i have said here on this site too :) Scent will pool, cling, and survive in shady areas and areas with lush vegetation. The moisture provided by lush green grass, the shade of a front porch, or the damp surface of a gutter are all examples of places where residual scent could be present several days after the source of the scent has passed through an area.

Scent survives longer in the cooler conditions found in the evening or early morning hours because lower temperatures will tend to bring the scent back down to ground level.

Hot and dry conditions have a negative impact on scent survival. In these conditions, scent is more easily dispersed and destroyed. Direct sunlight will dry out and quickly destroy scent vapors. In addition to the physical toll that it can take on a trailing dog, heat can also cause scent to rise above the level of where the dog is working.

The key to working a search dog in hot temperatures is to avoid it if you can.

(I too, have advised the same here on Family Disaster Dogs.)

You can continue reading the above article about how wind and weather affects scent by clicking here……>>>> 


The Scent of Fear of Panic  


Search dog handlers have long known that each emotion in a person produces different scents or pheromones (detectable chemical substances) that our dogs are able to detect and follow.  Prison dogs are known to be able to detect a criminal who fears getting caught in a crowd of people who are not afraid and area search dogs are able to find lost subjects by smelling panic in the air because a person who is lost soon becomes disorientated, confused and panics.

Qualified K9 Trainers can purchase different scent or pheromones from chemical laboratories that make scents and chemicals for perfume, medical drugs and research. Access to these chemicals is not allowed to the public because of the danger of some of the chemicals available.

A 2011 study published in Science magazine showed that tears act as a chemo signal or a chemical substance detectable by others. Not only did men who sniffed tears (which were brought on by negative emotions) find photographs of women’s faces less attractive, the men also reported that they were less sexually aroused, and the scientific data backed it up.

People can unconsciously detect whether someone is stressed or scared by smelling a chemical pheromone released in their sweat, according to researchers who have investigated the underarm secretions of petrified skydivers.



From The Whole Dog Journal

Below is another great article by a Veterinary about a how a dog’s nose should be cared for and why the nose is so effective in tracking down odors.

 Dr. Randy Kidd, DVM, PhD explains “The dog’s nose may be his most powerful organ and it is certainly one of the most dynamic of all animal systems, with activities that range from basic smell detection, to sensing fear, to memory, to emotions, to mate- and pack-selection, on to a genetic history carried from one generation to the next. Fortunately, disease doesn’t often waylay its functional capability, and fortunately again, most of the diseases of the nose are easily treated naturally. You can read more of the article here>>>


Happy Trails,

A note to viewers,
Family Disaster Dogs Book is tracking through editing and soon to be found here and online!!

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