Family-Disaster-Dog-Lessons

Tuesday, November 7, 2017

5 Ways To Help Your Dog Adjust To Their New Home




Whether you are moving to a new accommodation with your four-legged friend, or you are introducing a new pet into your home, there are several things you need to do to help them adjust. Your dog will adapt quite easily to a new situation, but here’s how you can aid them in the transition.


Pet-proof your home

The dog is a member of your family, so you need to pet-proof every area of your home. This is similar to welcoming in a child, such as making each room safe and putting away anything that could be a choking or chemical hazard. You should also work on the outside. Dogs love to explore, so ensure the fence and gates are secure and close up any other gap that could lead to your dog escaping. In a new area, they can easily get lost if they do.

Remember toilet training

As part of your regular dog training, you need to focus on this one aspect. This isn’t an issue for older dogs, but if you are welcoming a puppy into your home, you need to expect the occasional accident. However, if you have recently acquired an adult dog, there may be issues with nerves and excitement, leading to toilet troubles within the home. On the inside we recommend training pads, and in an outside area, consider Pet Zen Garden Grass, to make those trips to the toilet safer and more acceptable to everybody.

Create familiarity

Familiarity ensures your dog feels safe in the home. For a new addition, everything will be new, but you may still be able to bring a few of the dog’s belongings from their previous owner. For your long-standing pet, the same is true. Arrange your dog’s toys and bedding in a way that closely matches their old setup in your previous house. You should stick to familiar schedules as well, so continue with feeding and walking at the regular times your dog is used to.

Explore with your dog

On arrival at the new home, keep your dog on the leash. Otherwise, your excitable pet may run rampant around the house as they explore the new surroundings. Understandably, chaos will abound. By having control over your pet, you can safely guide him around the areas of the home they are permitted to visit. As part of your pet-proofing, safety gates should have been fitted to block off unpermitted areas.

After exploring the interior of the property, you should take them on a walk of the neighborhood. You can do this on your regular walking schedule, but your dog needs to get used the area in stages. New sights and sounds can prove alarming to an animal, so introduce the area gradually, so they know what to expect on future travels.

Create a fun environment

For new or existing dogs, it is important to create an area that is fun and mentally stimulating. Particularly when in a new house, you want your pet to be distracted by anything that isn’t the legs of your furniture. There are plenty of toys on the market that will keep your dog entertained, but remember to change things up a little with something new once in a while. Our pets get bored with the same old stuff as much as we do!



Thanks for reading




Thursday, November 2, 2017

Hound Health: Do You Know How To Handle It?


When you first get a dog, you may think that you’re going to know how to take on their healthcare needs. After all, you’re a human - and we tend to have quite complex healthcare needs, so theirs are going to be a breeze - right? Or so you first thought. Because actually, dogs need just as much care, if not more, than any human. It’s not always enough to assume that your dog will be healthy, just because. You have to make a conscious effort to improve their health levels. If you’re not really sure what you should be doing, then you’ve come to the right place. As we’re about to walk you through the five things you need to take care of when it comes to hound health.

Exercise Regularity

You probably already know that your dog is going to need exercise, that much is for sure. But, do you know how much exercise they need? Because it’s often specific to each breed. So you’re going to want to get to know what your kind of dog needs in terms of their exercise. Some breeds that need the most exercise include retrievers and collies, boxers and Jack Russell's. Of course, if your have a smaller dog, then they may not need as much vigorous exercises as some of the larger dogs, but you still need to know that they actually need.

Total Nutrition

Then, you’ve also got nutrition to think about. Again, you’re going to know that you have to feed your dog, and feed it the right foods. But do you really know what they are? And, more importantly, do you know what you need to stay away from? Speak to your veterinarian about the best nutrition for your breed, but be sure to avoid feeding them any human food if you want them to stay healthy.


Canine Health

From here, you’re also going to want to cover off their dental health. It’s easy just to assume that a dog's teeth can take care of themselves. But they can’t. Some people will want to use dental treats to help clean off their dog's teeth in a really easy way. But you can actually brush their teeth too. In fact, it’s something you should be doing, if your dog will let you. Get a dog toothbrush and start when they’re a puppy - it’s the best way to take care of their teeth.

Total Protection

Then, you’re also going to want to keep them protected from parasites. Just like we have to get shots to keep ourselves safe, you should use something such as Nexgard Spectra to do the same for your dog. Then, you’ll know that they’re covered when it comes to catching fleas and ticks.

Coat Care

And finally, there’s also their coat to think about. Although their coat health can often be determined by what they eat, you also need to take outer care of it too. That means bathing and brushing. Again, you should speak to your vet to get a personal recommendation, but in general, bathing once a month will keep them clean, and ensure their coat stays healthy.

Saturday, October 28, 2017

Understanding Your Dog's Protective Instinct

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We all know that dogs have a protective instinct. It’s an instinct that has been nurtured over thousands of years of evolution; a desire to protect the people they care about, the humans that they see as their family. For many people, the protective instinct is one of the foremost reasons to getting a dog, and this is all the more true if you’re thinking of disaster-preparation.

To truly get the most of your dog’s protective instinct in the event of a disaster, you first need to understand that instinct. How does it work? How can you utilize it to your benefits? Is that instinct transferable to different people or properties? Read on to find out all the answers you need…

What Exactly Are Dogs Protecting?

Given that many people use dogs to guard their home, it’s easy to think that dogs are protecting the actual building. This is a concern if you’re disaster-prepping. You may wonder if your dog will offer protection if you have had to bug-out and transfer to another location.

Here’s the good news: dogs don’t protect buildings with any particular vigor. Sure, they will bark if someone they don’t like gets too close, but for the most part the building isn’t really the concern. Dogs aren’t territorial in the same way that cats are. You can see this in action in the way we live with our pets; cats are allowed to wander around the neighborhood, as they will always find their way back to their territory. Dogs… won’t; if your dog gets out, there’s a high likelihood you’ll have to go and retrieve them rather than them coming back of their own accord.

So What Do Dogs Protect?

People. The only reason your dog is particularly concerned about your home is because you’re in it. Dogs can also be protective of items they consider to be “theirs”, such as blankets and bowls, but for the most part their focus is primarily on people.

You can see this effect in action if you take your dog to pet-friendly vacation rentals; they will be just as protective of your temporary home as they are of your actual home-- because you’re there. This is well worth remembering if you’re concerned about losing your dog’s inbuilt protective instinct if you, for any reason, need to abandon your home. If you’re there, then your dog is going to continue to be just as protective as they would be at your home address.

Can The Protective Instinct Be Controlled?

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You can’t stop the urge of the protective instinct, but you can train your dog so they don’t react to it unless you command. Basic “sit” and “stay” commands are your best methods here, so you can be sure that the protective instinct doesn’t go too far. Your dog is, after all, primarily a pet, so you’re going to want to know you’re safe to take them for a walk without aggression issues materializing.

In the event of a disaster, your dog’s protective instinct might just be your best friend. Nurture this instinct correctly, train your dog to control it, and then you can be reassured all is well-- wherever you are in the world.

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