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Thursday, November 2, 2023

Planning to Take your Pet on Vacation or Holiday with You

 I want to share this great guide and article with you, in case, you plan to take your dogs on holiday with you. 

Dogs are family, so spending holidays with them can have positive mutual benefits. This is further explored in the guide, 29+ important reasons to take your dog on your family holiday.

It shares some of the interesting discussions, such as:

  • Mutual benefits (for the person and the dog) when taking dogs on a holiday

  • Best pet-friendly places in the UK to explore when spending holidays with dogs for our friends in the UK and others who plan to visit the UK.

This guide also explores many insights and studies which elaborate on the reasons for wanting to get a dog. Found in the piece is a study from the Canine Behavior and Research team at Dog Trust that reported 48.2% of current owners and 69.7% of potential owners considered having a dog to facilitate their exercise. 

You can read the full version here:

https://www.dogfriendlycottages.co.uk/benefits-of-pets-on-holiday/index.html




Saturday, October 28, 2023

Biggest Mistake Dog Owners Make

 

Biggest Mistake Dog Owners Make

I just came across this fantastic free online workshop on dog training from the K9 Training Institute that I recommend that you sign up for right away.

This is the first workshop of its kind that is designed to help "normal" dogs like yours have the same level of calmness, obedience and impulse control as service dogs.

The workshop was a complete eye-opener for me and helped me understand why regular dog owners often have so much difficulty training their dogs.


Washee photo copyright A. Higgins


Giving Your Dog a Job to Do

One of the many things I learned from the workshop is the biggest mistake that most dog owners make with their dogs is that they don't give their dogs work to do.

The reason service dogs are so well-behaved is that they always have work to do.

Now, by “job” or “work”, I don’t mean that a service dog is always doing something physical in nature.

Instead, what I mean is that when you give a service dog the hand signal for the DOWN cue for instance, here’s how the service dog would have been trained to think:

“My owner has now given me the job of lying down. So I will remain lying down here in this exact spot until my owner tells me to do something else, because the job that my owner wants me to do for her now is to lie down.”

So unlike most “normal” dogs who think of DOWN as just a trick that they have to perform for a few seconds after which they can do whatever they feel like, service dogs think of DOWN as a serious job that they have to do with commitment, dedication and purpose until they get their next job from their owner.

As you can imagine, it’s a dramatically different mindset!

And this mindset is the reason service dogs are so well-behaved, and so many “normal” dogs (even if they know cues like DOWN or SIT) are not.

How to Train Your Dog to Have the Same Mindset as a Service Dog

The good news is that you can train your dog to have the same mindset as a service dog as well.

That’s precisely where K9 Training Institute's free online workshop comes in.

It helps you to train your dog using the exact same techniques used by the service dog training industry.

It's being conducted by Dr. Alexa Diaz (one of the top service dog trainers in the U.S.) and Eric Presnall (host of the hit Animal Planet TV show "Who Let the Dogs Out").

Frankly, the techniques described in the workshop are fairly groundbreaking - I haven't seen anyone else talk of these techniques.

This is because it's the first time ever (at least that I know of) that anyone has revealed the secret techniques used by the service dog training industry to train service dogs.

The tips shared in this free workshop work on ALL dog breeds - from small breeds like Pomeranians and Chihuahuas to large breeds like English Mastiffs and Great Danes.

Also, puppies as young as 6 weeks old, and previously untrained adult dogs as old as 13 years, have been successfully trained using these techniques.

It's not a live workshop - rather, it's a pre-recorded workshop, which means that you can watch it at your convenience.

However, while the workshop is free, I am not sure whether it's going to be online for too long, so please check it out as soon as you can.

Here's the link again.




Tuesday, October 24, 2023

If You Own a Dog, Or Are Just About to Get One, This is For You

If You Own a Dog, Or Are Just About to Get One, This is For You



Training a dog is certainly the hardest part of owning a dog. It can be very frustrating having a dog that is not housebroken, or barks excessively, or keeps pulling on the leash during your walks, or doesn't respond whenever it's called, or jumps up on people, etc.

You'll be fed up, because it’s pretty exhausting to keep trying to make them listen. You'll wonder how professional dog trainers help dogs behave exactly the way they (the trainers) want them to.

But hiring a trainer can be quite expensive, and to be honest, you don’t really need to.

I’ll explain how in a minute. First, let me talk about WHY your dog seems to be so hard to train...

The reason you are having so much difficulty training your dog is that you've been doing dog training the outdated way.

It's not your fault though. The fault really lies with all the bad dog training information that's out there on the Internet and elsewhere.

Most people start training their dogs using verbal cues or commands like SIT, STAY, etc. Because that's what they have been taught to do by numerous books on dog training and by all the videos they've seen on the Internet.

Here's the problem - that's exactly how NOT to train a dog!

Why?

Because the science of animal behavior says that starting your training using verbal cues sets your dog up for failure.

Dogs that are trained only using verbal cues never get trained properly. Or at least, the training doesn’t last long.

So what's the best way to train a dog?

The science is very clear on this - dogs are best trained by using body language. Now, this doesn't mean that you should never use verbal cues. What it means is that you should always START your dog's training using body language. Later on, you can bring in a verbal cue to reinforce your dog's training.

That's it? Yeah, that's it :-)

So how do you train your dog using body language?

I just came across this fantastic free workshop from the K9 Training Institute that helps you learn how to do just that.

The workshop is designed to help "normal" dogs like yours have the same level of calmness, obedience and impulse control as service dogs.

It's being conducted by Dr. Alexa Diaz (one of the top service dog trainers in the U.S.) and Eric Presnall (host of the hit Animal Planet TV show "Who Let the Dogs Out").

Frankly, the techniques described in the workshop are fairly groundbreaking - I haven't seen anyone else talk of these techniques.

This is because it's the first time ever (at least that I know of) that anyone has revealed the secret techniques used by the service dog training industry to train service dogs.

In the free workshop, you'll discover:

  1. How to train your dog using body language, rather than verbal cues
  2. The 3 key techniques that service dog trainers use to train dogs, and how you can use them too
  3. The most important step that "normal" dog owners have been missing (this is very important to get your dog’s attention, and it works 100% of the time)
  4. How to stop bad behaviors like excessive barking, pulling on the leash, jumping, etc.
  5. Why a lot of dog owners are unable to establish the amazing bond that service dog trainers have with their dogs etc.

The tips shared in this free workshop work on ALL dog breeds - from small breeds like Pomeranians and Chihuahuas to large breeds like English Mastiffs and Great Danes.

Also, puppies as young as 6 weeks old, and previously untrained adult dogs as old as 13 years, have been successfully trained using these techniques.

It's not a live workshop - rather, it's a pre-recorded workshop, which means that you can watch it at your convenience.

However, while the workshop is free, I am not sure whether it's going to be online for too long, so please check it out as soon as you can.

Here's the link again.

Sunday, October 22, 2023

About Family Disaster Dogs


Click above to preview the Family Disaster Dogs book


The Family Disaster Dogs books,  website and social media give dog owners a way to learn how-to prepare for disasters with pets by offering online posts and lessons that encourage the training of family dogs to assist in disasters and how-to use a dog to find people who may go missing. 

Visitors worldwide browse over 260 blog posts of dog care and training at familydisasterdogs.com where books, courses and emergency resource lists are available and regularly updated with new content.





Family Disaster Dogs has a huge following of furbaby households and global emergency response teams who frequent the site for information on current natural disaster events, dog training and preparedness for floods, hurricanes, tornados, evacuation and wildfires.

Author, Amber Higgins' work was first published in the 1990's offline newspapers and magazines. She has over thirty years experience in the pet industry and dog breeding. With fifteen years devoted to volunteer K9 Search and Rescue with her Bloodhounds and German Shepherd dogs. The books are available on the Amazon's distributor network in paperback, kindle and audible everywhere. She lives with her wolf and two bloodhounds.

The Books

Family Disaster Dogs

Evacuate with Your Dog's Help (Includes Evacuation Supply List, Pet CPR)

My Puppy Can Find Me children's book

Start Mantrailing Step by Step

A Squirrel Planted an Acorn ( A short story about nature)


Click to visit Amber's author page






Monday, September 4, 2023

How Dogs and Cats See the World around Us

 We humans assume that our furry and feathered friends see our homes and everything around us as we do. We seldom take into consideration what our dogs see when the dog does something wrong or during play and when we expose them them to new surroundings. 

Trainers and dog behaviorist call the dog reactive when the dog acts shy or nervous or aggressive in certain situations but do we really know if the dog is seeing the world as we do?



Many times when a dog is acting up and doing what we think is wrong, they are actually reacting to the environment around them and what they see may make a world of difference in how they behave. 

This article explains how dogs, cats and other creatures see things. I hope this article helps everyone see the world as the animals we have in our life do. Take a look around and what do you see from the animals point of view?

Quote from attached article , “When it comes to colours, dogs are dichromats. They perceive only yellow-green and violet-blue. Colours are perceived paler, like pastels. And some colours don’t contrast: that’s why a red ball on green grass will appear to them as pale yellow on a grey background, with little contrast.” 

So it’s possible, depending on the colour of the ball, that Scotch will not see it, and as a result, will gaze up at Samuel with a lost look. As for the infrared, he perceives heat through his nose, not through his eyes.

 Read more here  click to go to the article. 



Wednesday, August 9, 2023

What would you do with your Pets if a Disaster hits home? Be Ready with these Tips

If you have pets, you know how important they are to you and your family. They are more than just animals; they are your companions and friends. But what would you do if a disaster strikes, and you have to evacuate your home? How would you keep your pets safe and comfortable? Here are some tips to help you prepare for emergencies with your pets:


Bing AI generated image 

- Make sure your pets have identification tags with your name, phone number and address. It is a good idea to carry a card saying if you are injured you have pets alone at home. You can also microchip them for extra security.

- Have a pet carrier or crate for each pet. This will make it easier to transport them and keep them calm during stressful situations.

- Pack a pet emergency kit with food, water, bowls, leash, collar, harness, toys, treats, blankets, medications, first aid supplies and any other items your pets need.

- Keep a list of pet-friendly hotels or shelters in your area or along your evacuation route. You can also ask friends or relatives if they can host you and your pets in case of an emergency.

- Plan ahead for different scenarios. 

    What if you are not at home when a disaster happens? 

    Who will take care of your pets? 

    What if you have to stay in a shelter that does not allow pets? 

    How will you reunite with your pets after the disaster?

- Practice evacuating with your pets. Train them to get used to their carriers or crates and to follow your commands. Make sure they are comfortable in the car and know how to behave around strangers and other animals.

By following these steps, you can ensure that you and your pets are ready for any emergency. Remember, your pets depend on you for their safety and well-being. Don't leave them behind!

Stay Safe Out There!

Amber and Family Disaster Dogs


Bing AI generated image


Click Here is a Free Preview of my book to listen or read where you can learn what supplies are handy to pack and store for evacuation and shelter-in-place lockdowns.



Monday, July 10, 2023

Dog Training Tips and Resources 2023





The Evacuate with Your Dog's Help book explains how-to evacuate with pets. How-to make a bug-out (survival) bag for owners and dogs to carry. Every dog of any age or size can help its family evacuate. Be prepared for disasters with your pets. Learn what to expect at disaster shelters and from pet rescue during disasters. Included is a detailed expanded list of survival items for pets and owners with step-by step instructions to train your dog to carry a saddlebag to hold items to evacuate and "bug-out" with. Plus Pet CPR instructions and how-to calm a frightened pet. How-to find a lost pet. USA Evacuation Law for pets. 

Both of the books are free on Kindle and Audible. These books are used as a worldwide emergency preparedness resource from the author. Paperbacks are discounted to help with cost of publication. 



What is a Family Disaster Dog? It is Your Dog trained to Find and Rescue You!

Let me tell you how easy a pet dog of any age, size or breed can be your very own Search and Rescue Dog!

The Family Disaster Dogs book is full of fun and easy lessons that are tailored for the family to learn rescue skills in the comfort of the home during daily activities. Your pet dog is a Family Disaster Dog! 
Any size dog from the little Chihuahua to the Great Dane can help its owner survive..and they find you every day already when they want to play or eat so why not learn what else they can do to help you !



Take a look at my Amazon Author Page to read or hear previews of all my books. Thank you in advance for sharing the books and leaving a review which helps other dog owners find many helpful resources, including mine, in search engines.



 Stay safe out there this spring and summer!

Enjoy your dogs and do something new with them today! 

Thank you for visiting Family Disaster Dogs 

Be sure to look at the Page menu above, there are several pages to see and at the bottom of this post is a time line with over 250 articles for dog owners.

Sunday, July 9, 2023

Tips and How to Evacuate with Your Dogs Help

 How to Evacuate with Your Dog's Help

click above to see my book!



If you live in an area that is prone to natural disasters, such as hurricanes, floods, wildfires, or earthquakes, you may need to evacuate your home at some point. Evacuating can be stressful and chaotic, especially if you have a dog. However, your dog can also be a valuable ally in helping you and your family get to safety. Here are some tips on how to evacuate with your dog's help.


1. Prepare an emergency kit for your dog. This should include food, water, bowls, leash, collar, harness, ID tags, microchip information, medications, vaccination records, first aid supplies, toys, treats, and a crate or carrier. You should also have a photo of your dog and a contact number for your veterinarian. Keep this kit in an accessible place and update it regularly.


2. Train your dog to respond to basic commands and cues. Your dog should know how to sit, stay, come, heel, and leave it. These commands can help you control your dog in stressful situations and prevent them from running away or getting into trouble. You should also teach your dog to wear a muzzle if needed, as some shelters or transportation options may require it.


3. Socialize your dog to different people, places, and situations. Your dog should be comfortable with being around strangers, other animals, loud noises, and unfamiliar environments. This can help reduce their anxiety and fear during an evacuation. You can expose your dog to different stimuli gradually and reward them for calm and positive behavior.


4. Plan ahead for where you will go and how you will get there. You should have a list of pet-friendly shelters, hotels, or relatives that you can stay with in case of an emergency. You should also have a backup plan in case your preferred option is not available. You should also know how you will transport your dog, whether by car, bus, train, or plane. Make sure you have the necessary documents and equipment for traveling with your dog.


5. Keep your dog calm and comforted during the evacuation. Your dog may sense your stress and panic and react accordingly. You should try to remain calm and confident and reassure your dog with praise and affection. You should also keep your dog close to you and avoid letting them roam freely or get separated from you. You can also use calming aids such as pheromones, music, or toys to help your dog relax.


Evacuating with your dog can be challenging but not impossible. By following these tips, you can make the process easier and safer for both of you. Remember that your dog is not only your pet but also your partner in surviving a disaster.

Created with Bing AI


Recommended Reading:

31 Small Steps to Organize and Prepare for Emergencies

The New Prepper's Survival Bible

Here's a veterinarian approved pet first aid kit with everything you need for first aid.

Check out my book below, please leave a review on my books and help the search engines suggest the books so other people can learn too! Thank you and stay safe out there. 




We include products we think are useful for our readers. If you buy through links on this page, we may receive a small commission that helps with the cost of maintaining this site. 
Thank you for your support!

Family Disaster Dogs Author Interview by Rune S Nielsen

 I was interviewed by Danish epic/high fantasy author Rune S Nielsen.

"I was lucky to get an interview with dog rescue expert Amber Higgins, who writes fiction and non-fiction but always about dogs."

-Rune S. Nielsen


Copyright Rune S Nielsen

Read the Interview by clicking here

He has over 60 author interviews on his site above!

Plus awesome AI graphics and book covers he creates.

Saturday, July 8, 2023

How to Keep Your Pets Safe During an Emergency Evacuation

 How to Keep Your Pets Safe During an Emergency Evacuation

Hi everyone, welcome to my blog! Today I want to talk about a very important topic: how to evacuate with your pets in case of an emergency. Whether it's a hurricane, a wildfire, an earthquake, or any other disaster, you need to be prepared to take your furry friends with you and keep them safe. Here are some tips to help you be prepared.


Bing AI generated graphic




1. Make sure your pets have ID tags and collars with your current contact information. You can also get them microchipped or use a GPS collar for extra security. This will help you find them if they get lost or separated from you during the evacuation.

2. Have a pet carrier or crate for each pet, and label it with your name and phone number. Get your pets used to being in their carriers or crates before the emergency, so they don't panic when you need to use them. You can also put some familiar items inside, like toys or blankets, to make them more comfortable.

3. Pack a disaster kit for your pets that includes food, water, bowls, litter, medications, first aid supplies, vaccination records, and any other essentials they might need. Keep this kit in a convenient place that you can easily grab when you need to leave.

4. Plan ahead where you and your pets will stay if you have to evacuate. Many public shelters and hotels do not allow pets, so you need to find pet-friendly options in advance. You can check online resources and search for listings of pet-friendly accommodations. You can also ask your friends, family, or veterinarian if they can take your pets in case of an emergency.

5. Follow the instructions of local authorities and emergency workers when evacuating. They will tell you the best routes and places to go, and they will help you and your pets get out safely. Do not ignore their warnings or try to take shortcuts that might put you in danger.

6. Do not leave your pets behind, even if you think you will be back soon. Disasters can be unpredictable, and you might not be able to return home for a long time. Leaving your pets alone can expose them to injury, starvation, dehydration, or worse.

7. After the evacuation, help your pets adjust back to normal. They might be stressed or traumatized by the experience, so give them lots of love and attention. Monitor their health and behavior for any signs of illness or injury and contact your veterinarian if needed.


I hope these tips will help you and your pets be prepared for any emergency situation that might arise. Remember, your pets are part of your family, and they depend on you for their safety and well-being. Stay safe and take care!

Have a look at my book below and train your dog in the comfort of your home! 

Click to visit my huge emergency links page for more resources

Visit the Bug-out Bag page for a long long list of what to pack in an evacuation bag and to keep on hand for yourself and pets to survive without electric power, without heat or water and in the event of a disaster, and if your  family has to evacuate.

Thank you for visiting Family Disaster Dogs !

Stay safe out there,

Amber 

Founder, author, dog pro  





Here I am with the first Family Disaster Dogs, Willie G and Daisy who inspired this site and books.

All photo rights reserved by Amber Higgins





Little boy named Dumpster at a Family Disaster Dogs book signing 



My current girl as a pup learning to evacuate






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Tuesday, May 2, 2023